Judith

Klik her for dansk

Photo: Britta My Thomsen

Photo: Britta My Thomsen

Judith has been volunteering in Trampoline House's cleaning team for several years. She is also one of the little more than 350 people, who help securing Trampoline House's future through monthly donations.

"I support Trampoline House as a volunteer and as a donor, because I unfortunately have had to realize that the politicians in this country don't want to finance a decent treatment of asylum seekers and refugees. So apparently it's up to private citizens like me to make it possible for a fantastic place like Trampoline House to exist, where people from the asylum centers and everybody else can meet and be together in an equal way."


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Support Trampoline House

Every contribution matters. You can help ensuring that asylum seekers can be part of a community from their first day in Denmark.

It means more than you can imagine.

Sara

Klik her for dansk.

Photo: Britta My Thomsen

Photo: Britta My Thomsen

Sara is a part of Trampoline House's catering service Sisters' Cuisine. She is also one of the chefs behind Sisters' Cuisine's cookbook, Recipes Without Borders, where she shares her favourite recipes and tells about Iranian food culture.

When I was a child, I really liked cooking because my mother is a very, very good cook. There are a lot of good cooks in my family. I inherited it. My mother’s brother was a chef. He opened a food shop, and he taught me a lot of things. He was a very good chef.

But my mother didn’t let me cook! When I was around eight or nine years old, I would hide ingredients and when my mother was out I would run to the kitchen and make cakes. I learned how to cook on my own. I was 14-15 when I started cooking, but my mother still didn’t let me. And it didn’t go well; I kept destroying things. But slowly, slowly, I learned.

My parents are from southern Iran, so I especially know food from that region. In Iran, there are different foods in the south, the north, the east, and the west. I know a lot of vegetarian food and seafood, because southern Iran is close to the sea and we always ate fish in my home.

I cook for myself here in Denmark, especially food from my country. I know a lot of very healthy soups, which are good for winter. I try to make healthy food. I use ginger a lot in my food, and garlic. They’re good for this weather in Denmark. The weather here is not so cold for me, because I didn’t live in southern Iran, which is very hot. My city is in the middle of Iran, and cold. It’s not so different from here, but here there’s a lot of wind. My city is near the mountains, but here it is flat and windy.

It’s very important to me that I use fresh ingredients in my food. I know about the vitamin content in the ingredients I use. For example, ginger is good for your immune system. This knowledge is in my culture. Everyone in Iran knows about what the vegetables contain. Which spices are good for chicken, which spices are good for red meat, and which spices are good for fish. We have a lot of different spices and some spices are very good for the body. For example, turmeric is very good for the body. It helps prevent coughing and is good if you’re swollen up. 

There’s an old culture of knowing what goes well with what in Iran. What you should eat with what. When we have yogurt, we put mint on top because the yogurt is cold for body and mint is warm. It regulates the body temperature. We don’t eat fish and yogurt. Two cold dishes together are not good for the body. When we have salad, we don’t use yogurt, because yogurt has calcium and calcium kills vitamin C.

When we eat fish, we use cumin. We make rice and add the cumin at the end. This kind of rice goes well with fish, because fish is cold and cumin is warm. And after eating fish, my mom would give me dates because dates are warm. This is good for the body. And it’s old culture.

I have been in Denmark for around one year. I was in Jutland until I was moved to Korsør asylum center three months ago. It’s far away, but I really like it here. I come to Trampoline House regularly, and I also have an internship at the swimming pool in Korsør. I taught swimming in Iran.

My son likes it here a lot and I feel very safe here. I really like Denmark. My son is four and a half years old and goes to a regular kindergarten. He speaks a little Danish, but he’s learning more. His last kindergarten was a camp kindergarten just for refugees, but here in Korsør all of his classmates are Danish.

I didn’t choose Denmark. I came here on a very, very hard trip. During the trip, my son was so sick. I wanted to go to Sweden, but Sweden closed the door. I had to wait some days outdoors, and wait, and I couldn’t because my son had a high fever. So I stayed in Denmark, and I’m really happy to be in Denmark. God chose for me. Sometimes you choose one way but God brings you another way!

Since Sara shared her story, she and her son got asylum in Denmark.


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Click here to read more about Sisters' Cuisine's cookbook Recipes Without Borders.


Support Trampoline House

Every contribution matters. You can help ensuring that asylum seekers can be part of a community from their first day in Denmark.

It means more than you can imagine.

Mandana

Mandana (left) teaches Bible Class in Trampoline House every week.

Mandana (left) teaches Bible Class in Trampoline House every week.

Mandana converted from Islam to Christianity several years ago. Today, she teaches Trampoline House's Bible Class, using her own experiences to help others get closer to Christianity.

"When I converted, I needed someone to help me, and not just from the church," explains Mandana. "It was difficult for me, because we went to church, but only on Sundays, and the priest talks about something in his sermon, and it's difficult to understand it right if you're on a new path."

It's especially her experiences as a convert that inspire Mandana's Bible Class in Trampoline House.

"Our class is not like the church. We don't have a sermon or any defined topic. We talk a lot about what it means to be a Christian, also with regards to having converted. Every week, I give people the chance to choose which verse has affected their hearts the most, and if someone has questions they can ask them. And then we pray and sing together"

The Bible Class is in Farsi, which is Mandana's mother tongue. But if anyone wants to join who doesn't understand Farsi, it's usually easy to find someone who can translate. Mandana herself translates between Danish and Farsi, and it was also as a translator that she visited Trampoline House for the first time:

"I came for the first time two years ago. I had Bible Class in Hillerød in 2014, and people from our group also went to Trampoline House, and I came along to translate for someone. In my heart, I'm interested in helping people."

Trampoline House's Bible Class gets together every Friday at 2-3 pm. Click here to see our full calendar.


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Support Trampoline House

Every contribution matters. You can help ensuring that asylum seekers can be part of a community from their first day in Denmark.

It means more than you can imagine.

Frank & Madda

Frank (left) and Madda (right) both come to Trampoline House every week. Photo: Anna Emy.

Frank (left) and Madda (right) both come to Trampoline House every week. Photo: Anna Emy.

Frank has been volunteering in Trampoline House's cleaning team for 3 years.

"I like it here because I see so many people from all over the world and sometimes people from my home country of Ghana which gives me the chance to speak my own language. When I come here I feel happier and more energised than if I stay in the camp, where there is very little for us to do. Here in Trampoline House there are many activities. I learned how to speak Danish by going to classes here, and I was able to meet and speak with Danish people to improve even more"

His friend, Madda, is an intern in Trampoline House.

"What I like most about Trampoline House is the platform it provides for people. It's an open space where anyone can come and feel at home. The concept of it is attached to the fact that you have people living in camps and there is no communal space where everyone can be and just be there and be themselves.

People who come to the house can also get food, it is warm to be inside here and if you actually need assistance in any area Trampoline House can help with counselling, legal help and medical. It is a holistic place where you can get a little bit of everything."


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Support Trampoline House

Every contribution matters. You can help ensuring that asylum seekers can be part of a community from their first day in Denmark.

It means more than you can imagine.

Agob

Klik her for dansk

Photo: Anna Emy

Photo: Anna Emy

This is Agob. He is a hairdresser in Trampoline House, but he also just comes to hang out.

“I come to meet up with my friends and if one of them wants a haircut, they ask me and I just do it. I like the atmosphere, all the different people, the cultures" 


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Support Trampoline House

Every contribution matters. You can help ensuring that asylum seekers can be part of a community from their first day in Denmark.

It means more than you can imagine.

Christina

Christina Bilde is Spokeswoman & Head of Corporate Communicate of Roskilde Festival Charity Society

She explains why Roskilde Festival supports Trampoline House:

“The people involved with Trampoline house have really succeeded in creating a meeting place and an open environment that attracts people across ethnicities and backgrounds.
As we saw at this year’s Roskilde Festival, it’s been done by working in many areas: with food, with art, and through the meeting and conversation between people.
It is very inspiring, but unfortunately it is also an effort that is constantly, and particularly these days, under pressure. That is why it was important for us, now more than ever, to support you with a donation.”


Also check out


Support Trampoline House

Every contribution matters. You can help ensuring that asylum seekers can be part of a community from their first day in Denmark.

It means more than you can imagine.