SPECIAL EVENT: Oliver Ressler film screening and discussion on women migrant domestic labor

A warm welcome to a screening of artist Oliver Ressler’s new films Emergency Turned Upside-Down (2016) and There Are No Syrian Refugees In Turkey (2016) in Trampoline House’s exhibition space CAMP / Center for Art on Migration Politics.

The screenings will be followed by a discussion on migrant domestic labor in Sweden by researcher Samira Ariadad and Jens Strandberg and Jenny Richards from Konsthall C, Stockholm.

Free admission. All are welcome!

PROGRAM:

7–8 pm: Screening of Emergency Turned Upside-Down and There Are No Syrian Refugees In Turkey (Oliver Ressler, 2016) followed by a discussion with the artist.

8-9 pm: “Women’s Day Off,” a discussion by researcher Samira Ariadad and Jens Strandberg and Jenny Richards from Konsthall C, Stockholm followed by a Q and A session.


EMERGENCY TURNED UPSIDE-DOWN & THERE ARE NO SYRIAN REFUGEES IN TURKEY

Two new works by Oliver Ressler refer to the flight and displacement that war and conflict in Syria (and other states) have set in motion. Emergency Turned Upside-Down addresses the cynical and inhuman discourse that sees the presence of refugees in Europe as a 'state of emergency,' although this term really should be reserved for war, terror, or economic strangulation – the very reasons that lead people to leave their homes. There Are No Syrian Refugees in Turkey is Oliver Ressler’s most recent film, made on the occasion of his solo exhibition at SALT Galata in Istanbul. In it, Syrian refugees living as 'guests' in Europe’s largest metropolis analyze the political reactions of the EU and Turkey.

WOMEN’S DAY OFF

"Women’s Day Off" is a discussion on migrant domestic labor in Sweden by researcher Samira Ariadad and Jens Strandberg and Jenny Richards from Konsthall C, Stockholm. Women’s Day Off is the name of an event that took place in Iceland in 1975 in which 90% of women took ‘a day off’ to demonstrate against their working conditions and highlight the importance of their paid work and unpaid work in the home in their fight for equality.

Today, across the Nordic Region, women have been able to leave behind their designated role within the home and move into paid work by having a paid domestic worker who carries out the cleaning and cooking and cares for the children. This work is often poorly paid and performed by individuals who have migrated to Nordic countries.

Konsthall C will share their research into the Women’s Day Off and their current work with researcher Samira Ariadad to understand the conditions of domestic workers today particularly in Sweden.