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trampoline house recommends


Roughly speaking, there are only three things one can do in the asylum centers: eat, go to the toilet, and sleep.
It means that you languish, while all your skills and dreams slowly vanish.
In Trampoline House, there is a lot to do and I can put my knowledge and skills to good use.
— David Mpagi, asylum seeker and volunteer in Trampoline House since 2011


Integration from day 1

Integration works best when new citizens are invited to contribute and participate in society from day 1.

Asylum seekers want to contribute to the Danish society, but Denmark’s asylum policies don’t allow that – even though research shows that the uncertain waiting time in asylum centers has negative effects on people’s mental and physical well-being. This is detrimental not only to the individual, but also to their integration into society.

Trampoline House recommends that all asylum seekers should have the right to the following during all aspects and phases of their asylum-seeking process:

  • Education, internships ('praktik') and jobs
  • Regular Danish schools and kindergartens for children
  • Access to the public Danish health system
  • Access to housing inside Danish society with Danish neighbors

 

Basic human rights and democratic liberties

Good integration requires unconditional mutual respect for all citizens of a society.

Denmark is known for being a liberal constitutional democracy, but it is exclusive and marginalizing as long as democratic principles, liberties and rights don’t apply to people in the asylum system.

Trampoline House recommends that all asylum seekers should have the right to the following during all aspects and phases of their asylum-seeking process:

  • Access to professional free legal aid and fair trials
  • Access to professional free translation
  • Being treated as an equal, not a criminal